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TEAM SIGNALING

TEAM SIGNALING

TEAM SIGNALING


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Group Leader

Dr. Michael Wudick
Building: 26.14
Floor/Room: 00.110
+49 211 81-10396

I am fascinated by the way, plants can detect, react and adapt to external cues. Research in my team focuses on understanding how a local stimulus, such as leaf wounding, can trigger plant-wide responses and how plants can distinguish between different stimuli, albeit using the same set of signaling molecules and mechanisms. Together with my team, I aim to decipher the underlying pathways, molecular components and principles of wounding-induced long-distance signaling in plants. Ideally, gained knowledge can help improving plant yield, adaptation and resilience.

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Research Associate

Dr. Thomas Kleist
Head of Institute Imaging Facilities
Building: 26.14
Floor/Room: 00.104
+49 211 81-15177

I am a molecular and cell biologist whose primary research interests center on interplay among osmotic potential, electric potential, and mechanical force across cellular membranes. Part of my service to the institute includes acquisition, training, and management of equipment for fluorescence macroscopy and microscopy.

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Lab manager

B. Sc. Nicoline Gappel
Building: 26.14
Floor/Room: 00.104
+49 211 81-15177

I have been part of our institute from the beginning and support our team in all upcoming laboratory work, thanks to my experience with molecular biology methods and plant cultivation.

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PhD Student

M. Sc. Fatiha Atanjaoui
Building: 26.14
Floor/Room: 00.110
+49 211 81-13591

I am interested in wound-induced signaling in plants. Through electrophysiological methods and mass spectrometry, I aim to identify important components involved in the generation and transmission of the systemic signal, in order to understand how plants defend against herbivores.

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PhD Student

M. Sc. Juan Camilo Barbosa-Caro
Building: 26.14
Floor/Room: 00.110
+49 211 81-13591

I am interested in detangling the biophysical mechanisms that allow plants to perceive, encode, and transmit information about their environment. For this, I use a variety of techniques ranging from reverse genetics to in-vitro and in-planta electrophysiology, or with optogenetics.

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Master Student

M. Sc. Kristin Rang
Building: 26.14
Floor/Room: 00.110
+49 211 81-13591

I am currently working on my master’s thesis for which I am using yeast cells to shed a light on the transport specificity of ion channels involved in plant signaling. Overall, my interests lay in ecology and evolutionary biology.

Alumni

Cosima Sies

Technical Assistant

M. Sc. Cosima Sies
Jonas Wiese

Bachelor Student

Jonas Wiese
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